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How to reach out to cold contacts

This last year, I've met most of my clients through social media. As a result, I've finally taken my LinkedIn seriously and started posting on Instagram.

In the last 12 months, I've learned a few things about reaching out to cold contacts on social media. I've been contacted, and I've got a few businesses. So here are a few tips:

The Dream 100

Most of us use social media both for personal and business reasons. It took me more than six years to understand we must shift our mindset to get better results.

I've read about the dream 100 several times before, but it took a world pandemic for me to finally understand that what it means.

The dream 100 is a list of the 100 people you'd like to collaborate, work for or meet. If you try to appeal to the people you know and the people you want to be your customers, you do not create exciting content for either group.

The smaller the list of your ideal followers, the easier it gets to create content for them. If you go too small, your chances of them buying diminish. A 100 is a good number. This list is flexible; you may unfollow some people and follow new people depending on your business needs.

But if you also want to create content for your family and friends, you'll lose your dream 100.

I love my friends and family, but honestly, I'm pretty sure they are not my ideal clients or partners. And if they get angry because I unfollow them because I want to make my business grow, perhaps I have to reconsider their friendship. Real friends want the best for you.

So, be unapologetic and unfollow and follow according to your business needs.

If you don't want the nuclear option, you can always opt for a personal and business account. I don't because maintaining two profiles is too much work for me.

Do your research

Most businesses have either an email, beacons, or a website in their profile description. It often signals the preferred way to contact a company.

However, I'd like to argue that you must check their website even before clicking on the link. I've been contacted many times by people who don't know what I do.

These conversations always leave me with bad taste as It feels like we've both wasted our time when my services don't match their needs.

On the other hand, I've too sent messages asking for a service to the wrong company. The hassle could be eliminated by spending a minute looking up their website, and It could save both parties a lot of time.

What to write

I'm not sure if it is a cultural thing or if we believe we are THAT important, but we often want the people we are reaching out to to guess the details.

Whenever you reach out, try to include all the basic contact details:

  • Name
  • Contact info
  • Business name
  • What do you want

When you reach out, be sure the other party is going to check your profile and webpage. Most of us check our social media on the phone, so not including this information makes it challenging to investigate and contact you.

Try to eliminate as many obstacles as you can.

An email is always better than a DM, so if you can, email. DMs are easily lost, and it is never a good idea to rely on an imperfect notification system.

How to let your followers contact you

So knowing how to contact the people you follow is half the battle.

But I'm assuming you are creating exciting contact and want your followers to contact you.

There are a few key factors you must take care of:

  • Do you explain what do you do?
  • Who do you work for?
  • How to buy from you?
  • Do you have a link in bio?
  • Do you have a link to your website?
  • A preferred way to contact you?

I know it may seem like basic info, but sometimes the most obvious things are easily overlooked. So, spend a few seconds making sure your profiles are set up correctly.

And that's that. There's online more tip:

Don't spam

Don't stress too much about posting too much or commenting too many times as you provide value. Only you see all your messages, and they only seem like too much to you.

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